Deutsche Bank

Corporate Responsibility
Report 2016

Environmental data

Data collection process

Data on energy consumption, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, waste, paper, and water consumption (including Postbank) are consolidated in a global database that systematically analyses data covering the past ten years. Tools in the database enable analysis of environmental initiatives and performance, for example highlighting how renewable electricity has reduced carbon emissions. The system stores data and uses it to make estimates of key indicators based on present consumption and trends, so that annual carbon emissions can be accurately accounted, and offsets are purchased at the appropriate level to meet our neutrality targets. Data covers all locations, presently with 88% of our carbon emissions from actual metered or invoiced data. On the basis of these data, consumption is extrapolated for non-reporting sites to get our total energy consumption and GHG emissions. These data are quantified and reported in line with the international GHG standard ISO 14064. Waste, paper, and water data are also captured in this database. The figures for copier paper consumption are collected in 17 countries, including Germany, UK, and the US, and cover 89% of employees. The water consumption data is extrapolated based on floor area with actual water consumption data covering 63% of floor area across the globe. Full Time Equivalents (FTE) and floor data refer to respective annual average numbers. The environmental data collection, internal reporting processes and calculations, Verified Emission Reduction (VER) purchases and retirement, have been reviewed by KPMG.

GHG reporting

Our total emissions in 2016 from market based reporting were 249,596 tonnes CO2e. The total emissions from location-based reporting were 453,164 tonnes CO2e. The difference between location and market emissions of 203,568 tonnes CO2e is primarily due to the renewable energy contracts in the three largest electricity-consuming countries where the bank operates: Germany, the UK and the US.

The base year of 2007 is the first year in which we had the most reliable and complete data, as well as the methodology and processes in place to calculate the global emissions of the organization. The most significant changes to the base year have resulted from improved extrapolation methodologies. The methodology emissions based on the base-year market were 698,408 tonnes CO2e.

All data relates to 2016 and is presented as available at the time of reporting. Some data was extrapolated based on the previous year. Changes from the 2015 data are mainly due to:

  • electricity grid factor changes;
  • energy data updates where data wasn’t available at the time of reporting last year;
  • assumption changes;
  • extrapolation methodology changes; and
  • data centres that were outsourced in 2015, which have been removed (approx. 13,000 t CO2e).

The GHG reporting boundary is defined according to the GHG Protocol’s operational control approach and includes businesses and sites where Deutsche Bank staff hold executive positions in the company, and Deutsche Bank’s operational policies are implemented. Scope 1 GHG emissions are from the combustion of fossils fuels, owned and leased vehicles, and refrigerant leakage from cooling equipment; Scope 2 are delivered energy: electricity, district heating, steam, and cooling; Scope 3 are from indirect emissions from business travel, i.e. where emissions sources are controlled by others (air, rail, taxi, and hired vehicles travel).

We report our GHG emissions according to the GHG Protocol’s “Scope 2 Guidance: an amendment to the Corporate Standard,” released in January 2015. In line with the requirement for dual reporting, the table below shows GHG emissions from the market-based approach, using supplier specific emission factors, RE-DISS residual emission factors for non-renewable electricity consumption in European countries, or country grid average factor.

The contractual instruments supporting the zero carbon supplier-specific emission factors used by countries with a large renewable electricity supply include: Renewable Electricity Certificates (RECs) in the USA and Canada, Renewable Energy Guarantees of Origin (REGOs) for selected sites in the UK, Guarantees of Origin (GOs) in Germany, and International Renewable Energy Certificates (IRECs) in Spain. Alongside these major consuming countries, a number of others also hold zero carbon electricity contracts: Austria, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, and Switzerland.

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions1

In t of CO2e (unless stated differently)

Variance from previous year

2016

2015

2014

1

Total emissions are based on actual, estimated, or extrapolated data. All assumptions and calculation methodologies are in line with the ISO 14064 Standard Guidelines with supporting documentation. The most appropriate emission factors have been used for each activity data type, from internationally recognized sources, e.g. DEFRA (2015 and 2016), GHG Protocol, eGRID, and IEA (2015), RE-DISS (2015) or if more relevant, from country or contract specific sources. The factors include all GHGs where possible and the gases' Global Warming Potential as per the IPCC assessments.

2

Emissions from liquid fossil fuels decreased in 2016, largely driven by a reduction in diesel use in the Americas.

3

Emissions from HFCs increased in 2016. The increase is in the expected range of the installed volume of cooling plants.

4

Emission factors from IEA for electricity were used for the countries where DB operates (except for the US where the eGRID factors were used). The former set of factors is only available in tonnes of CO2, while eGRID factors are specified in CO2e. However, as the proportion of non-CO2 greenhouse gas emissions is minute compared to CO2, we are reporting all emissions from electricity in CO2e.

5

Air travel emissions continued to decrease due to an even stricter travel policy and increased demand for audio visual conferencing

6

For 2016, carbon neutrality was accomplished by the purchase and retirement of verified emissions reduction units.

7

Calculated electricity and heating intensities are used to estimate electricity and heating demand where data is not available. Calculated intensities from refrigerant gas loss are also used to extrapolate where data is not available.

8

Total energy consumption in gigawatt hours comprises all sources used in Scope 1 and 2: natural gas, liquid fossil fuels (mobile and stationary), renewable and grid electricity, district heating, cooling, and steam. Standard joule to kWh conversion factors were used. There is no sale of electricity, heating, cooling or steam.
Energy consumption reductions achieved in offices total 7.0 GWh from 114 initiatives (these saves are in-year, i.e. a save completed in June only gets 6 months of saves towards 2016). In branches the reduction was 0.6 GWh from 18 initiatives (these saves are annualised, i.e. a save completed in June counts for the entire 12 months of 2016). The types of energy included in the reductions are electricity, district cooling, district heat, natural gas. These totals exclude saves made in the Postbank portfolio.

9

Energy from primary fuel sources has decreased in 2016 due to a combination of decreases in natural gas use, owned/leased vehicles use and liquid fossil fuels use.

Total Market based GHG emissions

-6%

249,596

264,234

279,911

Market based emissions from building energy use

-4%

154,932

161,081

173,495

Emissions from business travel

-10%

89,728

99,483

100,360

Scope 1, direct GHG emissions

-1%

61,721

62,568

64,171

From natural gas consumption

-3%

30,050

30,973

31,544

From liquid fossil fuels2

-16%

1,294

1,548

1,613

From HFCs3

35%

4,936

3,670

6,056

From owned/leased vehicles

-4%

25,441

26,377

24,958

Scope 2, indirect GHG emissions

-4%

123,588

128,560

140,337

Market based emissions from electricity consumption4

-8%

82,985

89,765

101,146

From steam, district heating and cooling

5%

40,603

38,795

39,191

Scope 3, other indirect GHG emissions

-12%

64,286

73,106

75,402

From air travel5

-13%

58,742

67,423

68,524

From rented vehicles and taxis

-5%

4,229

4,453

5,340

From rail travel

7%

1,315

1,230

1,539

Emissions reductions

 

 

 

 

Off set of market based GHG emissions by retirement of high-quality carbon certificates6

0%

100%

100%

100%

Market based GHG emissions (incl. renewables, excluding carbon credits)/rentable area per sqm

2%

0.073

0.072

0.069

Market based GHG emissions (incl. renewables, excluding carbon credits) per FTE

-7%

2.47

2.66

2.87

Total energy consumption in GJ7

-2%

3,579,174

3,641,101

3,710,868

Total energy consumption in GWh8

-2%

994

1,011

1,031

Electricity consumption in GWh

-1%

607

613

632

Energy from primary fuel sources (oil, gas, etc.) in GWh9

-10%

203

224

226

Delivered heat and cooling in GWh

6%

184

174

173

Electricity from renewables in GWh

-1%

482

488

486

Space-normalized energy consumption in kWh per sqm

6%

289.9

273.8

255.6

FTE-normalized energy consumption in kWh per FTE

-3%

9,826

10,173

10,552

Distance travelled

In km (unless stated differently)

Variance from previous year

2016

2015

2014

1

Domestic and international air travel is derived from 99% of actual flight data; the remaining 1% is extrapolated based on cost. Air Travel uses GHG Protocol emissions factors. No radiative forcing factor is applied. Air travel distance continued to decrease due to an ever stricter travel policy and increased demand for audio visual conferencing.

2

Rail travel is derived from 97% of actual rail travel data; the remaining 3% is extrapolated based on cost.

3

Taxi data reported includes data for countries based on cost, and is calculated using a country level taxi tariff. For UK data, actual distance travelled and fuel data is used. Road travel uses DEFRA (2015 and 2016) emissions factors.

Total distance travelled

-10%

738,154,562

821,411,036

831,216,627

Total air travel1

-13%

531,597,238

609,585,770

619,266,242

Short-haul air travel

-7%

21,587,176

23,180,278

24,152,150

Medium-haul air travel

-10%

66,651,558

74,140,705

72,847,056

Long-haul air travel

-13%

443,358,505

512,264,786

522,267,036

FTE-normalized air travel in km per FTE

-14%

5,254

6,131

6,339

Total rail travel2

1%

44,203,381

43,648,162

49,734,589

Total road travel3

-3%

162,353,942

168,177,104

162,215,797

FTE-normalized total distance travelled in km per FTE

-12%

7,295

8,262

8,509

Water

In m3 (unless stated differently)

Variance from previous year

2016

2015

2014

1

Actual water consumption data is based on meter readings and invoices. Water figures are extrapolated on a site level, based on rentable area, and refer to potable (municipal) water only.

Total water consumed (potable)1

-6%

1,592,806

1,692,262

1,455,236

FTE-normalized water consumption in cbm per FTE

-8%

15.74

17.02

14.90

Space-normalized water consumption in cbm per sqm

1%

0.465

0.458

0.361

Waste and paper

In t (unless stated differently)

Variance from previous year

2016

2015

2014

1

Waste data including the disposal method and hazardous /non-hazardous split has been determined by information provided by the waste contractor. Waste data is extrapolated based on FTEs from Germany, the UK, the US and from eleven other countries, covering 72% of FTEs. Waste data does not include project waste, e.g. from refurbishments.

2

Waste composted in 2016 now includes data for Germany that previously was not possible to separate from recycled waste data. If this composted data for Germany was included in recycled, the total recycled would have increased 4%. In addition, as composted waste is accounted for in the waste disposed total, reported total waste disposed has increased accordingly.

3

Waste incinerated (without energy recovery) has increased in 2016 largely driven by an increase in waste generation from Postbank sites.

4

Waste landfilled decreased in 2016 as waste in Germany is no longer landfilled.

5

Hazardous waste has decreased in 2016 driven by a reduction in hazardous WEEE waste from Germany.

6

Copier paper data (“materials used” in GRI G4 reporting terminology) is extrapolated based on consumption per FTE from 17 countries covering 89% of FTEs.

7

A reduction in the number of printers, print pooling and behavioural change amongst staff has contributed to a reduction in paper use. A lower percentage of paper purchased in 2016 was from recycled paper. We continue to purchase paper originating from sustainably managed forests.

Waste

 

 

 

 

Waste disposed1,2

25%

11,159

8,912

10,058

FTE-normalized waste disposed in t per FTE

23%

0.11

0.09

0.10

Waste produced

0%

26,683

26,666

30,639

FTE-normalized waste produced in t per FTE

-2%

0.26

0.27

0.31

Waste recycled2

-13%

15,525

17,755

20,581

FTE-normalized waste recycled in t per FTE

-14%

0.15

0.18

0.21

Waste recycled in %

-13%

58%

67%

67%

Waste composted2

229%

3,156

958

287

Waste with energy recovery

4%

6,334

6,075

7,712

Waste incinerated (without energy recovery)3

11%

1,622

1,462

1,473

Waste landfilled4

-89%

46

417

587

Hazardous Waste5

-56%

224

505

620

Non-Hazardous Waste

1%

26,459

26,161

30,013

Paper

 

 

 

 

Copy/print paper consumed6,7

-19%

3,323

4,104

4,395

Recycled paper7

-39%

524

862

851

Recycled content in %

-25%

16%

21%

19%

FTE-normalized paper consumption in kg per FTE

-20%

32.84

41.28

44.99